RE/MAX Professional Associates
RE/MAX Professional Associates | 508-347-9595 | [email protected]


Posted by RE/MAX Professional Associates on 7/21/2019

Whether you're looking for the house of your dreams or the spouse of your dreams, it helps to write up a detailed description of the qualities that matter most to you!

While your goals should be realistic and attainable, you do not want to compromise your standards or aim too low.

In the case of house hunting, there are many conditions which will directly affect the success of your search.

Here are some of the main ones.

  1. Your budget: All things being equal -- the higher your budget, the greater your chances for getting everything on your wish list. The most desirable locations, lot size, amenities, and square footage often come with a price. The same can be said of homes that are in optimal condition with lots of recent updates, improvements, and energy efficient or high-tech features.
  2. The real estate market: Three factors which will invariably affect the outcome of your real estate search will be the local real estate inventory (the number of properties available -- especially those in your price range), the law of supply and demand, and property values in your chosen geographic area.
  3. Your real estate agent: Choosing a real estate agent who's experienced, resourceful, and dedicated can prove to be a significant advantage in finding a home that matches your budget, your goals, and your desired lifestyle. Once you've decided what you want in your next home, an agent or Realtor can show you houses on the market that will meet many, if not all, of your requirements.
  4. Your wish list: Creating a list of property features and characteristics that you absolutely must have in your next home will help ensure that you get them. A carefully thought-out "wish list" is also a vital aspect of your search for the perfect or "near perfect" home. By creating a clear mental picture of your ideal living space, location, and environment, you'll be increasing your chances of finding a home that meets all your expectations. There are literally dozens of features to keep in mind, including architectural style, square footage, the number of bedrooms and bathrooms, the size of the lot, distance from the street, privacy, the spaciousness of the kitchen, and the layout of adjacent living areas. If you plan on doing a lot of entertaining, for example, you might prefer an open floor plan. Features like a screened-in porch, a patio, and a large backyard are often major wish-list items for homeowners who enjoy outdoor living. Other items to consider may include things like a fireplace, a finished basement, a convenient laundry room, and a two-car garage. Proximity to stores, quality schools, medical/dental services, and recreation areas will also be key factors in the selection of your future home.
Thanks to the Internet and the many home improvement websites you'll find online, it's easy to get clear picture of your dream home, the countless decorating possibilities, and the many landscaping options available to you.





Posted by RE/MAX Professional Associates on 2/18/2018

If you have more than a couple children or an extended family that likes to visit frequently, then owning a large home may be a good match for your lifestyle. While some people immediately assume that a large house would be too expensive, that's not necessarily the case. There are several factors which influence price -- including location, market conditions, and, of course, the house itself. An experienced real estate agent can provide you with the guidance to determine what type of house is best suited to your family's needs, your budget, and your goals. Advantages of a Big House If you love to throw big holiday parties and host family gatherings, then a spacious house can be the perfect setting for that kind of lifestyle -- especially, if overnight guests are part of the plan. Having extra bedrooms also provides space for things like home offices, exercise rooms, and children's play areas. Big homes are ideal for large families because they enable parents and children to pursue separate activities in different parts of the house without disturbing each other. Lots of bathrooms come in handy when you have a houseful of company or just a big family all wanting to use the bathroom at the same time! Side note: A challenge for some home owners is resisting the temptation to use spare rooms as repositories for obsolete electronics, out of date clothing, outgrown toys, old magazines, and other things of questionable value. (I'll reserve that topic for a future blog post!) Are Big Houses "High Maintenance"? The first potential disadvantage that comes to mind when discussing the pros and cons of a spacious home is the monumental task of keeping the house clean. If your budget allows it, a good residential cleaning service is an expense that's well worth the cost. As is the case with all professional services, there's a lot of variation between prices, guarantees, quality, and personalities. That's why it pays to get at least two or three estimates to help ensure you're receiving the most value for your money. Another set of costs to keep in mind when eyeing a large house is heating, cooling, and maintenance. If you're thinking about buying a big home, those things should be factored into your decision. Other details to notice when checking out homes for sale is the amount of insulation in the attic and the energy efficiency of the windows and doors. A knowledgeable home inspector can help you make sure the house is well insulated and energy efficient. Otherwise, you could find yourself saddled with enormous energy bills that could have otherwise been avoided. Ideally, a spacious home should have a climate control system that enables you to regulate different 'zones' individually. That way, you don't have to waste energy heating or cooling parts of the house that are essentially unoccupied at certain times. Programming your HVAC system to accommodate changing energy needs at night and during the work day is another way to help control potentially high utility bills in a large house.





Posted by RE/MAX Professional Associates on 11/12/2017

Finding the ideal home for your family's needs is no easy task, but if you stay organized and focused, the right property is sure to come along!

One of your most valuable resources in your search for a new home is an experienced real estate agent -- someone you trust and feel comfortable working with.

They'll not only set up appointments for you to visit homes in your desired price range and school district, but they'll also help keep you motivated, informed, and on track. Once you know and have shared your requirements (and "wish list") with them, your agent will be able to guide you on a path to finding the home that will best serve your needs -- both short- and longer term.

In addition to proximity to jobs, good schools, and childcare, you'll probably want to pick a location that's close to supermarkets, recreation areas, and major highways. If you have friends or family in the area, then that would also be a key consideration.

While your immediate needs are a good starting point for creating a checklist of requirements, it's also a good idea to give some thought to what you may need in the future. Plans to expand your family, possibly take care of aging parents, or adopt pets are all factors to consider when looking at prospective homes to buy.

If you have college-age children or recent graduates in the family, you might have to save room for them in your new house. Many grads need a couple more years of financial and moral support from their parents (not to mention home-cooked meals) before they're ready to venture out on their own. Houses with a finished basement, a separate in-law apartment, or even a guest cottage on the property are often well-suited for multigenerational households.

In many cases, people tend to buy a home based on their emotional reaction to it, and then justify the purchase with facts. For example, if the price was right and a particular house reminded you of your childhood home, then that combination of elements could prompt you to make an offer on the house -- assuming those childhood memories were happy!

Sometimes prospective buyers might simply love the look and feel of a neighborhood or the fact that there's a spacious, fenced-in back yard in which they can envision their children or dogs happily (and safely) playing.

According to recent surveys, today's buyers are attracted to homes that have energy efficient features, separate laundry rooms, and low-maintenance floors, counter tops, and backyard decks. Gourmet kitchens, stainless steel appliances, a farmhouse sink, a home office area, and outdoor living spaces are also popular features. Although your tastes may differ, many house hunters also like design elements such as subway tiles, hardwood floors, shaker cabinets, pendant lights, and exposed brick.

When it comes to choosing the home that you and your family will live in for the next few years, your top priorities will probably include a sufficient amount of space, plenty of convenience, and a comfortable environment in which you and your loved ones can feel safe, secure, and happy for the foreseeable future!





Posted by RE/MAX Professional Associates on 7/2/2017

If relocation and house hunting is in the foreseeable future for you and your family, making a list of requirements and preferences will help ensure that you're satisfied with your next home.

Checklists are available from a variety of sources, including real estate agents and The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

While it's nearly impossible to find an affordable property that's a short drive from everywhere and that meets all your requirements, creating a prioritized list will help you clarify your goals and help you get the real estate features that are the most important to you and your family. Having a well organized list of priorities will also make it easier and more practical for your real estate agent to locate properties for sale that are aligned with your needs and preferences.

While the ideal home should be comfortably close to jobs, schools, childcare, and supermarkets, there are other conveniences and necessities that are sometimes overlooked by home buyers. Here are a few additional items to consider:

  • Medical and dental offices: Although it's difficult find the ideal house that also happens to be located just a short drive from all your family's medical and dental care providers, it's a goal worth considering when evaluating different properties. Being close to a preferred hospital can also be a desirable feature -- especially if you expect to be looking for top-quality maternity care in the near future.
  • Houses of worship: If you and your family attend religious services several times a month, it would definitely make life easier to live a short distance from your favorite church, synagogue, or mosque.
  • Automotive services: When you need an oil change, state inspection, AC maintenance, or car repair, it's much more convenient to have it taken care of close to home.
  • Transportation: Whether this item ranks high or low on your priority list depends on how often you plan on traveling for work, business, vacations, college, or family visits. For some people, proximity to airports, train stations, bus depots, and major highways can be a major benefit.
  • Recreational facilities: For families with active lifestyles, being close to tennis courts, golf courses, fitness clubs, playgrounds, walking trails, and other recreation facilities would be considered a big "plus". For others... not so much.
  • Entertainment: Again, it depends on individual lifestyles, but some people enjoy going to the movies, restaurants, concerts, and the theater on a regular basis.
The value of creating a list of requirements and a "wish list" boils down to clarifying in your own mind the conveniences, services, and facilities that are most important to you and your family. It's also a more efficient method of communicating your hopes and needs to your real estate agent. His or her objective is to help you find the residential property in your target area that best satisfies the majority of your goals, desires, and dreams.





Posted by RE/MAX Professional Associates on 12/20/2015

Thereís a lot to consider when youíre buying a home and itís easy to become overwhelmed with all the possibilities. Itís also easy to fall in love with a house simply because itís furnished tastefully, smells nice or has a beautiful front lawn. Be sure to look past the cosmetics of the house and keep the most important things in mind when you go house shopping. Donít ignore a house just because you donít like the color of the paint or wallpaper, because those are cosmetic things that can be changed to your liking. There are a few key features that are the most important things to consider when buying a house, outside of finances. Space Before looking at houses, decide how many bedrooms and bathrooms you absolutely must have for the size of your family. Then, consider if you really need a living room and a family room. Some people buy a house with both, and never even use the living room, making it an unnecessary waste of space. Do you work from home and need an office? Do you have young children who need a big yard to play in? Do you like to entertain and want an adult play room in a basement? Do you want to grow into the house and take future children into consideration, or will a large home just be too much? These are all things to consider before deciding how much home you really need. Commute Your commute is important and may be more important than you realize. Many people have made the mistake of buying a home too far from work and underestimating the toll a long commute will have on their lives. A long commute cuts down on your family and social life, increases stress, and may even cause you to lose sleep. Often it is better to find a home close to work and perhaps give up something you think is important in a home. This is all about keeping your priorities straight. Is Your Furniture Going to Fit If you have large furniture, or a lot of furniture, consider if it will all fit in your new home. Will that large over-sized dresser be able to be carried up three flights of stairs into your bedroom? Will your expensive, overstuffed sofa fit in the front door of an older home? Will the bedroom be big enough for your king-sized bed or will it take up the whole room? If you have a dining room now, does the new house have one also, or is that something you can forgo?